Parrotlets

Who are you calling little?!

Whoever came up with the name “parrotlet” was definitely on the right track! The name describes them perfectly! They are, indeed, every bit a miniaturized parrot. It’s amusing to watch big bird antics come from such a little body.

The parrotlet is a small bird with a big love of adventure and, given the opportunity, they will be off exploring every corner of their universe, and chewing on everything along the way. They bond closely with their humans and love attention, as long as you don’t interfere with their plans!

A word of caution for out of cage times, though: parrotlets can be very territorial and are completely unaware of their diminutive stature when it comes to defending the cage or a favorite person. This feisty little bird will not think twice about taking on another bird many times its size, or the family cat or dog. Their big bird attitude sometimes puts them in harm’s way.

They can be domineering and controlling even with another of its species with whom it shares a cage. Like little tyrants, they have been known to cause a cage mate to cower in fear, prevent it from eating, and will on occasion attack for unforeseen reasons.

A parrotlet will also take on a human. Don’t think that their size prevents them from landing a painful bite when they believe the occasion calls for one.

You're not the boss of me!

The bold little parrotlet is a bird that isn’t afraid to stand up for its “rights”. If it feels that you are being unreasonable in your requests for cooperation, it might take an aggressive stance with you or fly off to an obscure location. While you are looking for your tiny companion, please keep in mind that parrots of all sizes do not respond to punishment.

Unless you are able to catch your parrotlet in the commission of a crime and implement punishment immediately (such as going back to its cage early), your bird will never be able to connect the behavior with the consequences.

If you catch your bird chewing holes in the curtains and you pick him up and place him back in his cage, your bird will associate your picking it up (your FIRST action) with that behavior. He will make the association that when he chews on curtains, you will pick him up because that’s what you did. This could very well reinforce the unwanted behavior. When he lands in is cage unexpectedly, he will certainly not understand why he has been placed there and you will be regarded as mean and unpredictable.

The most successful way to break the annoying habits of your outlaw parrotlet is to find a meeting of the minds. Simply put: giving it a reason to want to do things your way. When a favorite treat is on the line as a reward, you’ll be amazed at how interested your little parrotlet will become in letting go of its need to always be the boss!

15 comments

Heather

We’ve had our parrotlet, Pixie, for about 5 years. About 6 months ago she started to become aggressive. She loves to have her head rubbed but other than that, she bites. She flies out of her cage and lands on me just so she can bite my ear or my neck. Why is she attacking me?

Heather
Missy Barber

I have a baby Quaker. About 12 weeks. I can not find any”treat” that he will eat to start training with. I am interested in clicker and target training but have nothing to reward him with. He only will eat the pellet.

Missy Barber
Alisa

I brought my 3 month old, fallow, parrotlet home almost two weeks ago. And just like the article states, she’s a large parrot in a teeny, tiny body. She is very affectionate and loves to cuddle under my chin and take a nap. Parrotlets are really intelligent too. My Sassy learns incredibly quickly! Parrotlets make wonderful companions if you’re willing to put in the time and work. I’m hooked!

Alisa
Loretta Russell

I love this it describes my parrotlet skittle perfecly

Loretta Russell
Vania benetta

Parrotlets are cute i want a parrotlet now

Vania benetta
May

I love these little things! Though I never had one! I had an Amazon before, but I was too young and untrained, and he grew to kinda hate me. I would love to have another parrot someday, but I’m not ready to take on the responsibility of raising something that will (hopefully) outlive me. So for now I am looking into getting a little parrotlet to help me prepare. I find it funny how there are so little about them in the parrot world. Any information is more than welcome! Thank you for everything you guys have done for birds. :)

May
Beverley

Sorry but I’m new here, I can see the questions but not the responses?

Beverley
colleen reid

Hi my one parrotlet his name is Vlad from Vlad the Impaler , draw your own conclusion still bites my hand I can bring him out on a towel pat him kiss him scratch his head but he will not go on your bare hand any advice. I find patience is indeed a virtue

colleen reid
Elina N.

Hello there! I recently purchased some parrotlets and didn’t realize some things I should’ve thought about sooner. While I haven’t acquired them yet, I have already ordered them. I ordered two parrotlets (a female and a male) with the intentions of possible breeding later on. I began to read forums and saw that having a couple of parrotlets untamed them and makes them ignore you. I’m very worried that my parrotlets will ignore my family. Is this true or false? If it’s true, what should I do to ensure the two will get along with each other and with my family? What would be my best option? Thank you!

Elina N.
Annette Moraleja

I currently have a 34 day old parrotlet that I’m hand raising. Shes doing great but I have a couple questions. ..should I wean her on to millet or straight to a pellet and chop..my other question is when can I start bathing her..I wipe her off when she eats but shes always got food on her..idk how shes doing it..thank you. I love watching you

Annette Moraleja
Marilyn L Babauscio

Do you have small pellets for parrotlets. Mine will not eat the larger pellets. Thanks

Marilyn L Babauscio
Sara Oldre

I am a first time owner of a 20 week old parrotlet. I have had him for 11 weeks. He loves being out of his cage. He’s starting to talk a little (sweet baby bird) in little breathy whispers, and is beginning to target train. My problem is that it never lasts long because he only wants to be ON me. How do I get him to stay on his perch to train?

Sara Oldre
Sharada Seurynck

My question is about biting. I, also, was told to just grab and hold him to show him who is boss. However, he just about bit my finger to bits. Now I am just holding my finger up to him and rubbing him. When he bites, I gently pinch his beak. What can I do? What kind of treats would he like best? He is only about 8 weeks old. HELP!!!

Sharada Seurynck
colleen reid

this is so true I have 2 of the feisty little fellows I inherited my moms when she past away will they ever like each other. They have there own cages. Hoped to someday be able to put them to gether

colleen reid
Renee Brown

I have had a parrotlet for 1 month. This is my first parrotlet. I have been having a terrible time trying to get him to come out of his cage so that we can try to bond. The breeder told me to just reach in and grab him. Now he is scared of my hands. Please help???!!!

Renee Brown

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