Quakers

The charming quaker parrot

The quaker parrot, (AKA the monk parakeet) has become a very popularly kept bird over recent years. It is native to South America, but is found in feral populations in different areas of the world. In the United States and Europe, it has adapted to be able to withstand harsh winter climates and is as close to a “native parrot” as either area can claim. It is a delight to watch them fly through an otherwise parrot-less sky.

Anyone who enjoys a quaker parrot at home will tell you what a fun species they are to have around. They are great talkers, with a large vocabulary which they develop from a very early age, and have some unique qualities that make them very interesting birds to keep.

In the wild, the quaker is the one parrot that is not a tree cavity dweller. It builds HUGE, multi-roomed, communal nests (some weighing up to 200 lbs!) that will house several quaker families. In captivity, the quaker will collect items from all over the house for nest building in its cage. If something turns up missing, your quaker has probably incorporated it into its nest.

In addition to stealing your stuff and talking up a storm, they have a warm and loving personality. They know how to turn on the charm when there is a favorite human around, especially if that human has a shiny object at hand.

Building a lasting relationship with your quaker

The quaker parrot will want to spend as much time with its human family as you can provide for. The more socialization your quaker has with ALL members of the family, the less likely it will be to develop a preference for only one person. This behavior generally progresses to aggression towards anyone else over time. It’s okay for your quaker to have a favorite person as long as it interacts well with ALL people.

Quakers are known for their intense cage territorial-ism – especially during breeding season. Their cage is their castle and they don’t much appreciate invasion of any sort – including the hands of their favorite human. Cage territorial-ism is not a problem behavior so much as a fact of life. However, the untrained and unsocialized quaker parrot will be less likely to hold back the bite when you reach in the cage.

As with all parrots, you will get out of your relationship with your quaker what you put into it. To avoid problem behaviors in general, you will find the most success by spending part of your bird’s out of cage time involved in activities where you are both focused on each other and share a common goal.

Taking the time to train your bird is the ideal way to accomplish this. It gives your bird the meaningful interaction it needs, while teaching it that you are a trustworthy and valuable friend.

This point is very clearly driven home in our DVD reality series: One Day Miracles. Dave and Jamieleigh Womach went into the homes of 12 clients to help them with their bird’s issues. In a live setting, the Womachs taped each episode (different birds, different environments and different problems) so that you can watch the techniques they used to help each family begin to improve their relationship with their birds.

21 comments

Joshua L

Are Quakers the exception to the rule to allow nest building behavior? I have been researching and have seen conflicting information all over. - Concerned soon to be Quaker dad.

Joshua L
Andrea

Hi I have a Quaker parrot and I wanted to know if the central heartier of my house will affect him in any way ? It’s almost winter and where I live it’s pretty much freezing! Thanks

Andrea
Julia

Hello, my Quaker is 16 years old. I feel like I need to change her food and also get him out of his cage more. Maybe get her a larger cage as well. She belongs to my parents but they are older and can’t really give him much outside the cage time. What food should I get? What size cage do I need to get? What types of toys are best for Quakers? Any help appreciated. Thank you! Julia

Julia
Ronnie Gebhart

Hi , I bought a Blue quaker parrot and I’m waiting for him to get weaned , but I would like to know what is the best diet food would you highly recommend ,

Ronnie Gebhart
Jacintha

We are planning to buy a quaker parrot to combine with our sweet Cocatiel. The parrot store said that we could bring our cockatiel to the store and match him/her with a young quaker parrot in the spring. And that they could live in the same cage. It sounds almost to perfect to be true do you know something about combining a quaker with a cockatiel? To explain the situation we bought a large parrot cage for our cockatiel in which he stays during the day. When we are home he has a lage play next to the couch and a lage play three. There is no lack of space, our Yuki is hatched in July 2020.

Jacintha
juan

what type of food do i buy my quaker parrot

juan
Rachel Rudisel

I’m getting a quaker parrot very soon im getting stuff every thing I need 1st. I watch u guys every day and I’m super excited want to get all the research and help before I get the bird thanks Rachel

Rachel Rudisel
Eli

Hi, I need help, my son buy me 2 Quaker parrot for my birthday on October . And they are 7 month old, every time I get near them they go away, I can’t even feed them with my hand or touch them, I think the boy is the one trying tú bite me every time I put my hand inside the cage, pleaseeeee I need help

Eli
Charlotte Chan

Um hi anyone has the same problem? I need help. My young 3 month Quaker is afraid of round things like balls, etc. He gets freaked out. It has caused some problems. Thanks.

Charlotte Chan
Charlotte Chan

My Quaker parrot has said to have hatched on August 10, but when I got him around September 5 he knew how to fly and climb and he was so funny! It’s only a month later and he always says peekaboo. Quakers are so awesome and clever. :)

Charlotte Chan
jaxy

hi! i have a Quaker parrot named Hero. he just turned 1 years old! his b-day is July 7. we want to buy a bigger cage for him, but there to much money. But i’m glad to see that your birds have a lot of room and the best parents/owners ever!

jaxy
Debbie

Wonderful to read about the Quaker parrot. 3 years ago I rescued my baby, Coco a male unknown age. He is handicap with only 1 true wing, but that doesn’t stop him from getting around his cage. I love to read about the other Quakers people have and live.

Debbie
Agnes Sva Ujfalussy

I had budgies and my orange winged amazon fr 43 yrs now a Quaker Bobbie. My parrot no matter how much you tired to switch him frm seeds to pellets I am slowly getting boobie to move foreward. And I don’t like prepackaged seeds fresh and food diets. I want to purchase Ur food cooking books

Agnes Sva Ujfalussy
Hugo

Hey my name is Hugo i recently got a parrot she is 2 years old and is a wuaker parrot she somewhat aggresive and needs so we take her out the cage and try to tame her but by but

Hugo
Violet Davidson

My Quaker was meant to be a Mother’s Day present for myself… he’s decided that even though I feed him and clean his cage and buy him things that I’m nothing but trash and absolutely favourites my partner :( I’ve tried everything and he just doesn’t want anything to do with me..

Violet Davidson
Kurt

I got a baby Quaker, its still in the process of coming home it was a surprise that I was getting him I already have his cage and I’m doing a lot of research, today I thought that maybe the best way to learn more is to talk to other owners of Quaker parrots. if anyone has any recommendations please tell me, any advice is helpful, thanks.

Kurt
madri

I Have 2 Quakers. they are about 3 weeks apart in age, they bite the crap out of me and everyone else. How do I stop that??? They are about 8 months old now. I got Kwikie (male) first at 5 weeks old then 3 weeks after that I got Donsie (female) at 3 weeks old. They did not get along and still fight a lot. Every time I take them out I end up with a few bite marks and they will rip the skin of, i just counted the bite marks on my hands, 12… about 7 weeks ago Donsie bit off a part of my ear. I got Quakers because everywhere they said Quakers are friendly and cuddly. But that has not been my experience!!!

madri
Alex

I have a Quaker parrot, I got him around jun July last year. When I saw him for the first time, he was small and had a lot of blackish greenish feathers, the end if his tail looked to be bitten and nibbles on. So I though there was something wrong with him, I took him to the vet and they said he is perfectly healthy. Since the day I brought him home, he was scared of everything and still is. Whenever I try to make him step up when he is in his cage he nibbles my finger instead from one end to the other. I found it weird. Now his feathers are nice and glossy. He is still smaller than the others. Whenever I hold something and he is walking around on the bench he runs over and nibbles my hand with kind of rage. He doesn’t like going to other people but me, whenever I put him down for a second he always screams and wants to be on my hand especially on my shoulder, however whenever I put him on my shoulder he nibbles the back of my ear the same kind of way he does when I try to take him out of the cage. He only steps up when I have a treat or I gently push his belly to make him step up but otherwise when I tell him to step up and I’m waiting for him to make the move he does the same thing nibble my finger with rage the same when I try and get him out of the cage. In general he is not calm (confident) and isn’t like other quakers like I’ve seen on YouTube videos Do you have any advice Please help me Thanks

Alex
Jasmine Duarte

A year ago, my Quaker parrot passed away. To cope, my mother thought getting me another one would make me feel better. The new one she got me was abused by it’s owners and he isolated himself. He likes staying in one place and seems like he rather be isolated. After a month of having him, he’s grown really close to me but he does attempt to bite others around him. He’s a really intelligent bird and that’s what I love about Quakers. I believe they are great birds to have and extremely intelligent.

Jasmine Duarte
Kelly Jenkins

Hi I have a Quaker parrot we got him yesterday and then we got near him he make sound like he’s scared or some think can u help we won’t to tame him how do we do i

Kelly Jenkins
Renee Mills

Yep! You nailed it! Quakers are the most fun in my opinion. They also like to pull pranks. They are hilarious & will teach every other pet in the household that THEY are in charge! If your dog or cat doesn’t comply they could very well be dive bombed or have a parrot standing on their head to get its point across. Peekaboo liked stealing our Scrabble game tiles & would take off in flight w/them. Peekaboo also didn’t like the dogs chasing each other past his perch, he would yell Stop It & yes, they stopped immediately because they didn’t want to get dive bombed. It seemed he knew what he was saying & why. Quakers have HUGE personalities, huge vocabulary & they learn very quickly. They are so much fun.

Renee Mills

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