RIP Bandit Boy

I know many of you are wondering what happened to Bandit, my male galah who was 11 years old, whom died while we were just a few days into a road trip that would lead to a Freeflight trip at a location he’d never been flying at, that I was so excited to take him.

Day 1: I picked him up from my outdoor aviaries at my parents house in the afternoon and loaded him up with my macaws, doves and project birds into our “bird trailer” (a small trailer we have equipped specifically for the birds with traveling cages, food and water, AC/heat and all the things they need while we are on the road. We traveled 1.5 hours to perform a show that night around 7pm. Bandit wasn’t used in the show, just my macaw Tusa, but everyone seemed great.

We left the show that evening and drove about 2 hours before stopping for 5 hours to sleep. Then we continued on driving for 16 hours.

I didn’t want to bother with fresh food feeding since I knew our trip was going to be a ton of driving and the trailer was jam-packed with things we needed for 3 different variations of trips (two different shows, one flight trip, and one trip Dave would leave to go to solo) so I only brought pellets and treats to feed.

The first sign that escaped me was Bandit’s lack of appetite. Because we were driving 16 hours out of the day the birds were not getting as much sleep as they should, and the driving makes it hard to eat, too. So the fact that he wasn’t eating super awesome wasn’t a red flag to me because:

  • I was over-feeding to ensure if they dropped pellets while we were driving, they weren’t going hungry (makes it hard to tell if they’re eating a lot or a little, though)
  • There’s usually a lack of appetite when first starting to travel or while traveling, especially when changing temperatures which we were going into very HOT temps where this is even more likely for my birds.
  • I still saw proof he was eating and knew it wasn’t as much as normal, but because of the above things it didn’t set off any alarms for me.


The night before I noticed something was wrong Dave took care of the birds and specifically said Bandit seemed his “normal” self, saying “night night!” when the lights were turned off for them to sleep. In the morning, I was admittedly in a rush to spend the day with my daughter as I’d promised her and so although I noticed his continued lack of appetite, I gave him fresh food and water, corralled Touche the Indian ringneck who had escaped a food dish and wandered over Bandit’s cage (which he did not appreciate) and left for the day to spend with my daughter.

When I came back that evening is when I noticed something was wrong.

Red flag #1: Bandit didn’t care what I was doing.

Normally, he’s all up in my business when I come in to care for the birds. He talks, tries to get my attention and earn a treat, and follows what I am doing. This time though, he was staring blankly at nothing and was completely uninterested. When I spoke to him, he didn’t respond.

Red flag #2: He hadn’t TOUCHED his food for the entire day.

I slid out his pellet bowl to find the pellets exactly as I had put them that morning… untouched.

Red flag #3: His poop looked abnormal

I immediately slid out his cage tray to confirm he had not eaten anything and examined his poop and DID NOT like what I saw.

I immediately called Dave to come to me. While Dave was on his way, I tried EVERYTHING to get Bandit’s attention and he would not turn to me. I opened the cage and tapped him and he acted like I came out of nowhere - like he could not see or hear me. I full out panicked and starting yelling at Bandit to try to get him to hear me or acknowledge me being there. When Dave showed up, he pretty much found me in hysterics. He grabbed Bandit and put him on the scale in the trailer. Normally Bandit weighs 315 grams, and he was at 250 grams. That’s when I immediately called an exotic avian hospital and rushed him there - it was 20 excruciating minutes away.

We both believed if he was able to just make it through the night, he might survive this.

The vet that met with us was not an avian vet, nor was she the one that was recommended to us by a few locals that I called upon for help… but she consulted with the head avian vet there on Bandit’s case. However, she did try to send us home 4 times with a “critical care feeding pack”. I pushed to have her keep him, incubate him and medicate him ASAP or he wouldn’t make it through the night. I told her my presence was only startling him, not comforting him and I couldn’t take him home knowing that. He surely wouldn’t make it in my care, he needed emergency help now… birds die quickly when you notice the signs like these too late. I refused to take him home.

I got a call in the morning from an avian certified vet who was now on Bandit’s case and informed me he made it through the night. They planned to change from oral medication to injected medication to get it directly into his bloodstream. They also planned to crop feed him which means putting a tube/syringe directly down to his crop to put food there so he does not have to swallow it. I was heading to a local pharmacy for the other meds they needed for him when they called me to tell me he died.

He died 12 hours after I noticed all the signs. 

Sadly, without asking me, they canceled many of the tests I’d originally requested when he passed away. They didn’t realize I would still want those answers and information to determine what happened (the vet did say the necropsy would show the results of most of those tests anyway). I immediately ordered a necropsy which the vet performed that afternoon… and told me she could not visually tell that there was any damage with her naked eye, that she would have to send tissues and organs to a pathologist for answers.

I know I got one of two of the best pathologists in the USA working on his case. And still, the cause of death could not be determined. “A possible toxin of some kind” was a thought. The vet told me I could spend thousands of dollars testing against individual toxins and still never know, there were too many out there and no clue as to where to start.

Because we had other birds with us we wanted to be sure it was nothing contagious so those tests were run first to ensure the safety of the rest of our flock. When we got home from our trip, we immediately took all the other birds in for bloodwork and exams and had the results looked over by 3-4 different avian vets for assurance that the current flock is healthy and okay.

Although I don’t have any sort of confirmation on what it was, because of the lack of damage to his organs and no “wounds” that anything could have gotten in through and infected him by, I have picked apart the way I do things in the search of something to change for the better.

I questioned the sand, and I brought it up to numerous vets including the one that performed the necropsy on him. Everyone has said sand in an aviary is not a problem, not even if the birds ingest some, but that it isn’t the most ideal bottom and that cement is better because you can clean it easier and they can’t chew it or ingest it (sand remains in the crop for months as its not easily digested). I was told sand wouldn’t hurt them if ingested, even though parrots should never be provided with grit in their diet, but IF something like heavy metals was found in the sand that that could cause damage over the long-term.

To add more confusion, we use a couple different variations of sand. One of which was high in iron, and one of which was not. Something I never knew how to test until this situation caused me to look closer. Even going back to the people who sell the sand, they swear up and down there’s no heavy metals in the sand… and even though there’s very SMALL amounts, there IS. I let them know this when I discovered it for myself. Even in the white super fine sand that they say is clean because it’s used for sand-blasting… it still reacts to an Earth magnet which means there is some amount of iron in that sand. I could not find a sand free of iron when I looked locally.

I had very good avian vets arguing over iron, but the deal is, I have a toucan who is very sensitive to iron so I don’t want it in any of my aviaries for his health alone.

My galahs are natural ground-foragers and to keep my birds off the sand I always used portion control as much as possible so that they weren’t going down there for leftovers that would have sand possibly stuck to them (not to say it never happened) also Bandit was notorious for going to Rocko’s aviary to scavenge any dropped toucan pellets he could find.

From this point onward though, I will advise against using sand. Although it made clean up quick and seamless, it also created more dust than likely necessary and popped up a ton of questions that no one could agree on answers to and that scares me. Although I don’t have confirmation the sand killed Bandit, it’s something that I feel I could do better and use something that would not come into question in the future.

My immediate solution was to get rid of the sand and replace it with newspaper and unwaxed butcher paper, but this entire situation made me get creative with how to BETTER my system overall.

I told Dave it would be amazing if we could build a metal frame work that held the aviaries just high enough to let toy chunks and paper pass through, but also was on wheels so I could push them around and get underneath them to clean, as well as push them onto our driveway for pressure washing. It would make the entire space much more clean and would mean I could take better care of the enclosures too.

Steam cleaning is amazing but so time consuming and brutal in the summer heat. If I could steam clean in the winter, but pressure wash in the summer, I’d have a much easier time keeping the place looking nice. He agreed and got to work on specs someone could weld together so it’s now in the works.

Here are instructions for sending substances to get heavy metal or pesticide testing:

Fill out this form: https://www.lsu.edu/vetmed/laddl/forms/specimen_submissions.pdf

Send in your sample and payment with your filled out paperwork, I got results in 3 days on lead, zinc and iron for $111.

More resources:

28 comments

Andi

I am sorrowful to read and watched the YouTube what happened to Bandit. He was a unique bird and full of adventure and brought us laughter into our homes. He is a loss that can’t be replaced. My deeply felt condolences to you.

Andi
Tracey

I just heard about about Bandit and my heart goes out to you. I inherited a Galah (Sydney) from a family member and knew nothing about them. I was so grateful to discover your videos and I learned a ton from them. I adored Bandit and I’m so sorry for your loss.

Tracey
jeff

I am so sorry to read about the loss of your Bandit. I cried while watching your video and had to stop several times before I could get through the whole thing. It is so sad to lose a special friend like this. Nothing can ever prepare you for the loss. I can understand what you are going through. Last year I lost my #1 bird, my Jenday conure, Oogle. I have 4 other birds – and I love them all – but Oogle was one of those “once in a lifetime” pets you get if you are really lucky. She was my first bird, and she was the reason I got my other birds. She was so special. I can talk about my Oogie for hours, as I’m sure you can about your Bandit. I would like nothing more than to be able to sit with you and exchange story after story about our babies for hours on end. My birds give me so much pleasure. I am never bored nor lonely when I am with my birds. In Remembrance Of Oogle I have always had pets all my life. They have always brought such love, joy and laughter into my life. I cannot imagine how empty, sad, and lonely it would be not to have pets. People without pets must lead such an empty and lonely existence. If a person is really, really lucky, once in their lifetime they have a special pet like Oogle. I have never had a pet so completely steal my heart like she has. She has left a hole in my heart that can never be filled. I remember the first word she learned. When I would put her to bed each evening, I would always cover her cage, say good night, and I would whisper “I love you.” She would try to say it back, but it would come-out as “sch-you”. I knew what she meant. We did this every night, and I’m convinced she knew what I was saying as well. I knew that someday she would die, as all things do, but this was totally preventable. Had I not placed those Cage Protectors in the birds’ cages, I know she would still be alive today. Before those Cage Protectors, Oogle and all the birds were doing just fine. Oogle’s sneezing and wheezing began just a few days after I placed those things in the birds’ cages and I did not put 2 & 2 together. I left it in her cage for 2 weeks before I realized what was causing her respiratory issues, and by the time I removed it, it was too late – the damage had been done. It was like exposing her lungs to mustard gas. What a terrible thing to do to something you love. If I had not placed that thing into Oogle’s cage she would still be alive today, I am sure of it. I have killed my very best little buddy in the whole universe that anyone could ever have. I can never forgive myself. And yet, she still loved me and held no grudge against me, right to the very end. A pet’s love is truly unconditional. I am so very, very sad. I am writing this so others can be warned of the danger of these items. I KNOW these Cage Protectors caused Oogle’s death. If someone said to me, “Your life depends on you answering the next question correctly. You have 2 choices – which statement is most likely true?” a) The Cage Protectors caused Oogle’s sickness and death b) The sun will rise tomorrow My answer would be (a) every time. There is not a single doubt in my mind. And I would bet everything I own and my life on it. I know it to be true. Please, warn anyone you know with pet birds to never buy these Bird Cage Protectors. They are available at most pet stores and appear harmless, and, for the conscience bird owner, perhaps even a good product to protect your pet bird . They are NOT!! They are a small, hollow, white, metal disk about the size of a hockey puck. They are filled with an aeromatic to ward off mites, fleas, and other bugs. They can be deadly. If any good can come from Oogle’s death, then other bird owners should be warned about the danger of these Cage Protectors. Please, please inform anyone with birds to never purchase these items. If this can save someone else from the heartache I am feeling at losing my best little buddy, then perhaps Oogle’s death can have some meaning. -———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————— Oogle died this morning – Saturday, October 26, 2019 at 6:45am while I held her in my arms. She had finally lost her 11 month battle with a respiratory infection. She was a real fighter. She was 23 years old. I had given her the metacam dosage last night at 11:00pm. She had been crying-out in pain every 20-30 seconds as the effects of the last dosage had worn-off, even as I held her. She always wanted to be with me, no matter what time of day. About 30 minutes after the dose of metacam she began to calm-down and stop crying. The drug was finally taking effect. At 1:00am she had calmed, and I could not stay awake any longer, so I put her to bed. At 4:30am I awoke when Rocky had a night fright. Rocky, a cockatiel, had fallen and was flapping around on the bottom of his cage, in the dark. I got out of bed when I heard Rocky fall and the flapping begin. This comotion usually makes all the birds stir to see what’s happening. But this time when I checked, Oogle was just “sleeping” with her head down and against her cuddle-buddy. I didn’t like this sign. I looked closely and she was still breathing, so I decided not to disturb her – for now. Her meds were due in 30 min. at 5:00am. At 5:00am I got up to give Oogle the next metacam dose. I found her completely motionless, but still breathing, on the bottom of her cage! She had been sleeping in her “cuddle area” on the platform when I had checked on her at 4:30am, when I was awakened by a night fright from Rocky. She must have awakened when I was there 30 minutes earlier, but couldn’t summon the strength to get my attention. Oogle probably tried to climb down or move around the platform perches and fell to the floor. And I didn’t even hear her fall!When I found her, she was sitting upright on the floor, but barely breathing. I took her out of her cage, and was going to give her the metacam, but there was no point. She was barely breathing and making absolutely no sound – no crying at all. I knew the end was near. I held her in my arms for the next 1 hr. and 45 minutes to comfort her and make her feel safe, all the while singing her song to her, and crying. Occasionally she would move her head and look-up at me, and then try to snuggle deeper into my shoulder. I keep saying to her, “It’s alright. It’s alright. I’m here, I’m here.” But I knew it wasn’t alright. I thought I had lost her several times. I would say, “Are you still with me?” She would move her head and open her eyes and look-up at me. She understood exactly what I was saying. At 6:45am she made a last, desperate flutter and it was over; she was gone. I already miss her so much. My heart is broken. My best little buddy in the world is gone. I thought I was pretty well informed about bird health and care, but obviously not well enough. I have spent a lot of time reading and searching for answers since oogle’s death. I am commited to never letting something like this happen to my other birds. Below is something that I read that gives me a little peace…. “The best way to meet the loss of one we love is by knowing that when we truly love, it is never lost. It is only after death that the depth of the bond is truly felt, and our loved one becomes more a part of us than was possible in life. As long as we remember, our loved one is never truly gone." I would like to end with a poem… Rainbow Bridge Just this side of heaven is a place called Rainbow Bridge. When an animal dies that has been especially close to someone here, that pet goes to Rainbow Bridge. There are meadows and hills for all of our special friends so they can run and play together. There is plenty of food, water and sunshine, and our friends are warm and comfortable. All the animals who had been ill and old are restored to health and vigor; those who were hurt or maimed are made whole and strong again, just as we remember them in our dreams of days and times gone by. The animals are happy and content, except for one small thing; they each miss someone very special to them, who had to be left behind. They all run and play together, but the day comes when one suddenly stops and looks into the distance. His bright eyes are intent; His eager body quivers. Suddenly he begins to run from the group, flying over the green grass, his legs carrying him faster and faster. You have been spotted, and when you and your special friend finally meet, you cling together in joyous reunion, never to be parted again. The happy kisses rain upon your face; your hands again caress the beloved head, and you look once more into the trusting eyes of your pet, so long gone from your life but never absent from your heart. Then you cross the Rainbow Bridge together…. Author unknown…

jeff
Ben

we had a lory parrot before, it died when a new puppy came. maybe out of jealousy i dont know. it just started not eating, his head is always on its back i rush it to the nearest vet but didnt make it. my mom who is the closest to lory was the most affected i heard her crying at night. losing a parrot is just as painful when losing a dog.

Ben
Rhiannon Fugatt

I have known birds to die from fear or stress and they go downhill very quickly and usually die within 12 – 15 hours depending on the type of stress. In chickens this can happen more frequently then other types of birds. Does stress or fear have the same fatal symptoms for parrots as it does for other birds? I would think so. I have one rooster I had just moved into a new pen closer to the yard my dog is in. I had moved him in there right at dusk. Found him facing a corner the next morning not responding to my voice or to his favorite treats. I picked him up and put him in isolation, in a warm cage with hay bedding and a heat lamp, covered with a blanket with fresh supplemented water and food. I also administered some extra supplements. He was gone within a couple hours. I took him to the vet for necropsy at UCDavis and nothing was found. This also happened once before on one occasion many years ago, same thing also involved moving them into a new yard. So wondering if your bird just experienced too much stress from the trip or from something else they encountered during the trip? Anyhow, so sorry for your loss.

Rhiannon Fugatt
Jan Hansen

Jamie, Dave, and Capri, Although I don’t have a bird, have always been a dog person, I recently have become addicted to your youtube videos and have loved watching not only your training of your birds, but your interactions w/them, and how much you include them in your everyday life. I can only imagine your devastation at losing Bandit, and hope/wish for you peace, and love. From my limited view, he had a wonderful life with you, surrounded w/your love, and that you only, ever did the best for him. Sincerely, Jan Hansen

Jan Hansen
Shelly Barrell

Jamieleigh and Dave, I am terribly so for your devastating loss of Bandit! I unfortunately have to say I can feel your pain having lost 2 of my birds in the last 6 months both to a quick and shockingly sudden death with no explanations. I first have to say I found you two thru your videos months ago. I found them engaging, real and educational. I was hooked! I watched for hours, ordered toys and training and food. I had recently rescued a Dusky conure who needed help. I have changed his diet, your fresh in the am and pellets at night, have worked on training basics and hope to keep going but my confidence has been shaken to say the least. I was out of town when both my birds passed (separately). I have not been able to figure it out, and I worry now constantly. My birds, this time of year are kept inside because of the heat. (Arizona) I try to bring my Conure out early in the am to spray down his cage, and to get some fresh air. I am sad for you both as Bandit was such a beautiful boy! I know you will miss him forever and I am glad you have your memories preserved in videos!

Shelly Barrell
barbara defiore

Dear Jamie& Dave, My heart goes out to you the pain is real you will always remember Bandit he was special. He is now flying with all the other birds high in the sky RIP Bandit

barbara defiore
Jessica Marie Barriere

Dave and Jamieleigh, what you do makes a difference. I hope this works lol and blesses you so that you can continue you pursuit of answers to your heart’s content, and I hope it causes you to feel even a tiny fraction of how loved you are, by SO many. I am SO so so terribly sorry for your loss. Words are entirely inadequate. https://www.gofundme.com/f/This1s4uBandit

Jessica Marie Barriere
Kate

My comment matches exactly with Chris M. Just started watching you today and feel your pain. I’m so very sorry. I love birds, any kind, but am too old to get one. Bandit was breathtakingly beautiful. That poem your friend gave you made me cry. Bless you for being such a loving caretaker to these birds.

Kate
Dave and JamieLeigh

Oh you guys! I cannot even imagine the weight and sorrow you all are experiencing right now. I am 71 and after losing too many dogs and cats went to birds about 15 years ago. I sometimes will talk about rehoming our 4 birds- but they are very special individuals to us. We have 4 birds and use a big monkey cage and a big bird a cage similar to a california cage to help board them. Although my boy blue and gold Pacho is not free flighted I have taught him how to fly indoors and now he is trying things out outside underneath our Pergola. We are fellow Idahoans and live in New Meadows with lots of birds of prey that keep our parrots on their toes. We have a caique (she is the sentry), a rescue cockatoo (yes JamieLeigh they are all psychotic), a rescue female blue and gold plucker that we had to rename Precious because she is- does not yell, does not throw food, just a beautiful spirit), and my male blue and gold Pacho who has flown off when spooked multiple times. An all day- sometimes night event to get him back. This was before he “knew” how to fly. So far this summer he has not taken off when startled by something. So yes, I know how these crazy little animals get under your skin but burrow deep into our hearts because of what they share with us. Grief work takes a long time and hurts. I prey that you will be kind to yourself and be able to do your grief work in as short a period of time as possible. All the best. John & Alberta Sonntag New Meadows, Idaho The video of spreading the ashes was well done! Thanks for sharing

Dave and JamieLeigh
Chris M

I’m so sorry. I just found your YouTube channel today and was watching the video on Cockatoo’s with Bandit in it only to find the RIP Bandit Boy right afterwards. My heart goes out to you.

Chris M
Cynthya Ball

May your family and flock be blessed with peace. Just wondered if you’ve ever heard of sarcosystosis. Undetectable until death. Read that it can be sudden, ok one day, not the next. Has to have a host that can carry. Possums (not sure if that is the only source) can carry and needs a host (a.k.a. middle man I.e. flies and other insects, rodents) to be passed on to livestock, dogs, cats, birds etc. Maybe something to check into. It’s hard without answers. Find out if veterinarians in your area are familiar with the above mentioned. Would be interested to know if they are familiar with it… It’s a strong worry for us down here in the far south… Due to our wild life… Surely it would have been detectable in the aftermath if they are familiar with it…

Cynthya Ball
Sherry H

Extremely sorry for your loss!!! My heart aches for you!!! “Death leaves a heartache no one can heal, Love leaves a memory no one can steal”

Sherry H
Joseph Przytula

Hey guys, man I wish I could take some of the pain you’re feeling. We all loved Bandit. We all love you guys . You and Bandit and the whole flock are pioneers. I wish I could express how much Bandit and you guys have improved my life. I lost one too, an African Grey, Hagar, I had her 33 years. Similar circumstances, still painful to speak about but, I tried to cover as much ground as you did in discovery and came to this conclusion, I had made Hagar a climbing tree out of fresh cherry branches. I’d done this every summer for her but this time, I used screws from a new box that were guaranteed not to decay. I really think she died from the protective crap on those screws. A whole lot of good came from that though. I realized I couldn’t live without her, studied the internet for clues and knowledge and found Bird Tricks and the flock. I had no idea how much our cool birds wanted to communicate with us. I bought all your training courses and believed that was the most awesome thing I ever saw!! I live with Coby now, a Blue and Gold. I named him Smaug but, it put too many people off hahah!! I got him as soon as your stinkin awesome kit came in the mail, chop sticks and clicker and encouragement!! He is five now, August 7, he is so well trained and super friendly and the biggest pain in the neck you’ve ever seen. I live in Utah now and Coby moved here from Jersey with me, sat on my shoulder in the cab of the U -Haul, had to sneak him into the hotels along the way!! Hahah I really need you guys to know the life changing value of what you do, you and the flock. I wish I knew you guys with Hagar, I don’t think I even began to know her in comparison to Coby with your advice and food, communication is everything and you guys are the pioneers that bring that to countless other cool birds and us out here. Nothing is a waste, or loss, it’s all progression and you guys are hopefully very proud of what you do for us out here, it is beyond price and me and Coby love you guys and thank you so much!! Joey

Joseph Przytula
teresa vigil

I am so sorry, this is something no one ever wants. Go with your gut on things get rid of the sand. You see bandit again, i promise. xoxox teresa and ken vigil 6 kids- 24-13-9-8-7-6) *( 16 birds) , 1 goffin cockatoo, 1 ecelectus, 2 cockatiels, 2 conures, 10 budgies.

teresa vigil
Lynn fraelich

I’m so sorry about the loss of your darling bandit. I have a cockatoo and my heart would RIP from my chest if something happened to him. I’m praying you will find comfort. God bless you

Lynn fraelich
Karren

Dear Jamie and Dave! My heart broke when I saw this news! So many lovely loving words already sent and so as a mutual bird lover, mama to one macaw ( Blue and gold) I can only send all my feather love to you and wish you a time to heal and know you did all you can and be thankful for ever minute you had sweet Bandit! 💜🙏🏻🤗 hugs and love – year long plus fallowed 😘🥰🙏🏻

Karren
Lu

I watch your videos all the time so feel like I almost know you all. I have birds also. When I saw this video about Bandit it was like blow to my chest. I cried as if he were my pet. So sad. I wish you all peace and healing. Bandit will always be with you and will watch over you from heaven. This may sound weird, but I believe our pets will greet us in the next life. That idea helps me heal from the sadness ❤️

Lu
Nancy Hermann

Im so sorry to hear of your loss. I do not have birds but i have house bunnies and know how quickly a bunny can sicken and die. I knew about teflon pans and birds but did not realize rabbits were also at risk here. Bless the internet where we can share our joys, our sorrows, and information. Every little bit helps.

Nancy Hermann
Jacqueline  Jennings

Could Bandit have had a toxic allergic reaction to a bug (wasp, bee, beetle, spider, tick)? It would take a short period for the toxins to travel throughout the body. The wasting on only one bird in a flock traveling could occur from a bug, spider, ect. The bite marks or stings would be too small to find unless you were pertcularly hunting for it. The lack of concentration or focus could have been cause by toxins from the sting or bite and would quickly shut down the birds system without distorting or destroying the organs because it would attack the nervous system. Could this be a possible cause? I am so sorry for your loss…my heart goes out to you, family, and flock.

Jacqueline Jennings
Bill Anderson

The comment on fireworks got my attention, most being loaded with heavy, toxic metals that wind up in smoke in the air. And, they are discharged with little apparent concern. This smoke usually settles to the ground, widely spread so its usually not a problem. But, ??? So sorry to hear about Bandit.

Bill Anderson
Kitty Ellis

I don’t see any way to help. I also lost a maluccan in the same way. I’d like to help with a donation to Bandit. I Don’t see a way to do it. Can anyone help?

Kitty Ellis
Joyce McClaran

My heart breaks for you. I don’t know how you feel but I remember how I felt when I lost my soul dog without even knowing she was sick. The guilt, the “if onlys”. My pain has never gone away. Whenever I remember that sad day it hurts so bad. The only difference is I don’t think about it as often.

Joyce McClaran
LightoftheMoon (Nan Scott)

Oh, Jamie and Dave! Just watched the video and came here. I am in complete shock. Oh, BanditBoy! Sobbing for all of you and your family, friends. I am so sorry! Word’s alone can’t convey my deepest condolences and sympathy to you and your family. Both of you ARE the very best in the whole world! Thank you so much for for sharing everything. Love and bear hugs for all of you, Nan

LightoftheMoon (Nan Scott)

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